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The Dreaded NCNS


Having a “NCNS” notation in your applicant or employee file is a red flag for future employment possibilities. NCNS stands for No Call No Show and means just that – the employee or applicant was scheduled to work, but did not call in and did not show up.

Let’s take a look at three different circumstances that result in a person’s file being flagged NCNS. More important, learn how (and why) to avoid be considered NCNS.

Skipping the interview

Your interview with us is an essential first step in the hiring process. If you have scheduled an interview at our office and your plans change, we understand. Things come up. Perhaps you’ve had another job offer. Or your child is sick. Or you simply changed your mind. In any case, your best course of action is to call us to reschedule or to cancel.

Calling takes only a minute of your time, but speaks volumes about your sense of responsibility.

If you decide to reconnect with us at a later date and we find the dreaded NCNS in your file, you will have to work at recreating a good impression.

Not reporting for work on day one

You have transitioned from applicant to employee. You have completed an initial application and interview, met with the client/potential employer, and have been selected for the position. And then … you don’t report for your first day of work.

In some cases, there’s a good reason – car trouble, medical emergency, or other urgent situation. Don’t be afraid to call. In fact, we expect you to call. You will have a phone number for our office (where you can leave a message 24 hours a day) as well as a contact number for your on-site supervisor. Call both numbers. As long as the reason is a valid one, we can work to accommodate you.

Expect a call from us if we haven’t heard from you. We will be checking to make sure that you are all right and to learn why you are not at work.

If you have changed your mind about accepting the position, give us as much notice as possible. Remember, you have made a commitment both to us, the staffing agency, and to our client.

Being absent from work

NCNS after being employed usually happens for one of two reasons – an emergency or job abandonment. Occasionally, a family crisis or other major event will make it impossible for an employee to call. A true emergency is understandable. Even if you can’t call us and your on-site supervisor, we will be trying to contact you. Whatever the situation, it is important that you contact us as soon as possible.

Not acceptable is simply failing to call in. A no call/no show conveys a lack of respect for us, for the supervisor, and for your coworkers. Many employers automatically terminate an employee who doesn't show up for work and doesn't call.

Sometimes an employee quits a job, but doesn’t let the employer know – a situation referred to as job abandonment. Often, people abandon jobs because they are afraid to tell employers or because they lack commitment to the job. Best practice is to give an employer two weeks notice. Providing sufficient notice helps to build a positive work history and avoid being marked as a NCNS.

Bottom line, a NCNS is not something you want to have as part of your file. Whether you are scheduled for an interview, starting a new job, or are on the roll as an employee, call if you cannot arrive on time. You never want to burn a bridge where a job is concerned.

Ready to schedule an interview with Employment Edge?

Give us a call at 271-5627.

 

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